Radio Show – Coffee With Derek on iMAN FM

Coffee with Derek 13/04/2017

Programme : Coffee with Derek 13/04/2017Presenter : Derek CheshireGuest : Stuart Mcadiewww.imanfm.com

Posted by IMAN TV on Thursday, 13 April 2017

 

Every Thursday on Iman FM Derek Cheshire produces and presents the radio show Coffee With Derek. The show is centred around business and creative thinking but sometimes we wander a little off piste. The show got its title because at the start, Derek provided many creative techniques that could provided help and/or insight in the time it took to simply drink a cup of coffee.

The time changes throughout the year but currently the show is broadcast live between 1:30pm and 2:30pm BST on 103.1FM in Sheffield and the surrounding areas. If you wish to listen on the internet then please click here. Please be patient when doing this, the program is buffered and it may take up to 30 seconds for the audio to begin.

Many of the programs are also streamed live to Facebook and YouTube. By clicking on the image above you can listen to the interview with micro entrepreneur and Smart Coffee promoter Stuart Mcadie.

To see and hear more of Derek please visit the Video And Audio page of this website.

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Student Tuition Fees – Who Should Pay?

Who should pay student feesA new paper published by the Intergenerational Foundation this week states that student tuition fees are economically inefficient. The press release for the paper states:

A new paper published today challenges the current funding system in higher education, calling it “economically inefficient”. In the paper, Dr Kevin Albertson, Professor of Economics at Manchester Metropolitan University, points out that the public benefits of a young person’s getting a higher education qualification more than outweigh the costs, according to the government’s published figures.

The paper uses an alternative way of thinking about the economics and is a very good example of how creative or alternative thinking can be used to solve problems and change the status quo.

Click on the link to download the full press release and contact details of the author Student Fees - Who Should Pay?

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Creativity: Make Every Mistake Count

Creativity involves learning from mistakes

“Mistakes are the portals of discovery,” James Joyce.

Your mistakes probably will not bring the internet to a grinding halt or shut down the banking network for a few hours but you never know! Whatever happens it is in your own (and maybe your company’s) interests to own up and make the best of the situation.

Here are just a few ways that you can recover and learn from the situation. After all creativity is based upon a whole host of learning events.

Own up and own the mistake. Whatever the reason for things not going according to plan just own up. Don’t blame the people who let you down or the unfortunate circumstances that unfolded. Hold your hands up, realise what has happened and what can be learned and take action (or plan if appropriate).

Fix things if you can and tell someone. Don’t fix things and keep quiet. Mistakes often have potentially serious knock on effects which you may not know about. If problems are visible to everyone then more people can be on the look out or be involved in providing solutions.

Address the root cause. If you systematically reflect on mistakes, you will realize there are patterns in your performance that contribute to these errors. Use some creative techniques to do this if you can, it will stop you trotting out all of the old solutions that have not worked in the

Share what you learned. Not only will you now have some extra knowledge that will stop you making an idiot of yourself in the future but you will be able to stop others doing the same. Your negative moments will be turned around and be seen as positive. Just trying not to have too many mistakes!!

Experiments should be treated in much the same way as mistakes, if you play and have some unexpected results then try to share them.

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Procrastination Is Good For Creativity

Mona Lisa teh result of procrastinationProcrastination is usually  characterised as  a negative habit but this is not necessarily so. If you are working to a tight deadline, trying to complete an assignment or aiming for a difficult goal, procrastination will almost certainly delay successful completion.

Here we need a little reflection and to be honest with ourselves (and possibly our colleagues at work). If I delay because I am lazy then I should recognise this and take some action to ensure that I correct this behaviour. But in the world of creativity and innovation we sometimes hang fire completing something, and make several iterations in order to try and make sure that we deliver the best solution possible. This is one of the golden rules of creative thinking ‘cycle often, close late’.

Procrastinating can only help you to improve  an outcome  when the (tangible) benefits of delay outweigh the risks of hasty progress.  In such cases, procrastination allows time for reflection and learning and to incorporate our learning into current rather than future work.

We must therefore learn to procrastinate strategically to avoid threats (or minimise risks), become more innovative, and discover original and creative solutions to our problems. Why not build in a little ‘procrastination time’ into your project plans?

Here is just one example of a famous procrastinator, Leonardo Da Vinci. Researchers estimate that he painted the Mona Lisa in fits and starts over a period of several years, starting in 1503, and not completed until just before his death in 1519. Critics said he wasted his time on various experiments and other distracting activities that prevented his paintings from being completed earlier. Did he in fact make use of any of these lessons in his works before he died? What would the Mona Lisa have been like if it had been completed in say 1504?

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The Creative Egg or The Creative Chicken?

Which comes first the chicken or the eggWhich comes first, and do we care? You may think that organisations are creative and think they must come up with ideas. You may see organisations that generate ideas and then think that they must be creative. So which comes first?

If we try to work out the solution to our little dilemma we will be here for ages. In a way creativity and ideas are just manifestations of something else that is going on.

Penicillin was discovered by Alexander Fleming due to a rash of untidiness. He could not be bothered to tidy up before going home and then going on holiday. A month later he returned to discover something strange growing in one of his petri dishes and realised that something significant was happening. Further investigation led to the discovery of penicillin.

Creativity (and ideas) come about through friction and tension. This can be effort vs laziness, humour vs seriousness, chaos vs order and so on. When these tensions occur then unexpected, and sometimes seemingly trivial things happen. All we have to do is simply be ready.

Some say that luck is what is required to come up with a good idea to exploit. This is not true, what is needed is serendipity. This is a piece of good fortune coupled with an ability to realise the significance of the lucky event and the ability to take action.

So whether you are trying to be creative on your own or as part of a large organisation don’t get bogged down in systems and processes (QA will probably favour the Chicken and HR the Egg) just keep an open mind and be ready!

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